Three dames who starred in The Crown join Netflix’s calls to add a storyline disclaimer

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Three women from the British Empire who starred in The Crown have said that Netflix needs to add an on-screen disclaimer making it clear that the royal drama’s explosive storylines are fiction rather than historical fact.

The call comes from Dame Eileen Atkins, Dame Harriet Walter and Dame Janet Suzman, who have been named DBEs for their service to the drama, after a number of public figures have already invited the American broadcast giant to act.

Last week, Sir John Major denounced The Crown in this paper as a “pan of malicious nonsense”. And just days ago, Dame Judi Dench called it a “raw thriller” and urged Netflix to add a disclaimer.

The call comes from Dame Eileen Atkins, Dame Harriet Walter and Dame Janet Suzman, who have been named DBEs for their service to the drama, after a number of public figures have already called on the American broadcasting giant to act.

The call comes from Dame Eileen Atkins, Dame Harriet Walter and Dame Janet Suzman, who have been named DBEs for their service to the drama, after a number of public figures have already called on the American broadcasting giant to act.

Lady Harriet Walter

Mrs. Janet Susman

Dame Harriet Walter and Dame Janet Suzman both played roles in the song series, arguing that the series needed to acknowledge their commitment to acting

Last night, Mrs. Eileen, who played Queen Mary in the first series, said: “My friends in America tell me a lot of people out there think it’s a documentary. Most of the time, when you talk about real people, you say this is fiction based on facts.” I don’t know why this didn’t happen.

Dame Harriet, who played Sir Winston Churchill’s wife Clementine, said: “People have believed Shakespeare’s version of Richard III for centuries, but no one lives to object on his behalf. In contrast, many people alive today could be hurt if they thought the public could to believe it.

This newspaper led Netflix’s campaign to recognize its commitment to the business.

“This is clearly a fantasy and people need to know,” said Ms. Janet, who played the literary agent in the fourth series.

“There should be a disclaimer in all the episodes,” said Jemima Khan, who worked on the show until they broke off with her last year over the filming of her friend Princess Diana.

Last week, Netflix released a new trailer, accompanied by an online statement acknowledging that the drama is a “fantasy play.”

But she has so far refused to add a similar statement on television.

The new series, which covers John Major's premiership and Prince Charles and Diana's split, is set to be the most controversial yet.

The new series, which covers John Major’s premiership and Prince Charles and Diana’s split, is set to be the most controversial yet.

The new series, which covers John Major’s premiership and Prince Charles and Diana’s split, is set to be the most controversial yet. It contains scenes without any basis, including Charles Major’s deputy about his mother’s abdication – prompting Sir John to make rare public intervention last week.

The request for a liability waiver was backed by big names in British drama. “Mrs Judy’s comments are absolutely correct,” Sir Patrick Stewart told S Department. “It’s important to make sure that people are aware that they are seeing a fictional version of people’s real lives,” said Jenny Agutter.

“Rumours and insinuations are just an issue and there are enough of them at the moment,” said Downton Abbey representative, Ms. Penelope Welton.

“If this series were about another family, there would be a defamation case in court,” said Felicity Kendall.

Historian Lady Antonia Fraser said: “I firmly believe that there is a difference between history and fiction. It shouldn’t be a blur. Netflix should make it clear to viewers at the beginning of each episode that it’s a fiction. They can then move forward with what they have the most. [fictional] series.’