Several Indigenous academics and politicians lined up in support of Australian netball players who protested the presence of Gina Rinehart’s company’s name on their uniforms, leading her company to end the $15 million sponsorship deal.

But outspoken senator Jacinta Price of the country’s Liberal Party argues that Ms Reinhart is a “pioneer” who has spent millions improving the lives of Indigenous Australians and should not be judged for her father’s sins.

At the heart of the feud between netball players and Mrs. Reinhart lies a notorious interview in which her father, Lang Hancock, suggested getting rid of the “unacceptable” Aboriginal population through sterilization.

Lang Hancock, who appears here with his wife Rose Porteous, gave a notorious television interview in which he suggested sterilizing tribes that do not accept whites.

Lang Hancock, who appears here with his wife Rose Porteous, gave a notorious TV interview in which he suggested the sterilization of tribal peoples who do not accept white “civilization”.

Hancock’s 1984 TV interview was cited as the reason why Diamond League footballer Donnell Walm refused to wear a uniform.

With other team members joining Wallam in Solidarity, Ms. Reinhart rips up the deal, albeit with a four-month grace period for the sport to find new sponsors.

Liberal NT state senator Jacinta Price broke with other prominent native speakers for Netball Australia’s call to “develop a backbone” and stand up to the “selfish” and “wake-up” demands of athletes.

“Unless you have a few million in your back pocket to support your sports icon, your bright self-esteem should be your personal opinion and only your own opinion,” she wrote in a lengthy Facebook post.

“Sports laws, businesses and society in general need to develop a backbone and stop blaming good individuals on ‘no’ for their selfish demands, which may only lead to accusations of racism or bigotry.”

Senator Jacinta Price urged Netball Australia to do so

Senator Jacinta Price urged Netball Australia to “develop a backbone” and stand up to “wake-up bullies”.

Senator Price said the weak are worse off.

“While you allow bullies to bully, it is the weak who end up losing. My niece is an aspiring Indigenous Australian netball player and now she is looking to make her future even more difficult.”

Senator Price described Ms Rinehart as a “pioneer who spent millions improving the lives of Indigenous Australians” and said she should not be judged on what her father said “a few years ago”.

“If we choose to judge others by the actions or words of their family members, we will undoubtedly stare in disgust at every person we meet if we are to be so honest,” she wrote.

“It’s time to grow up.

“Suck it up, beat all the mischief you want, and move on, especially when you have the choice and the privilege to do so!”

Diamonds soccer player Donnell Wallam felt uncomfortable wearing a Hancock Prospecting uniform due to an interview with Lang Hancock.

Diamonds soccer player Donnell Wallam felt uncomfortable wearing a Hancock Prospecting uniform due to an interview with Lang Hancock.

On the other side of the debate, Max Linoy, lecturer on Aboriginal people at James Cook University in far north Queensland, said Hancock was proposing his “solution” to the Aboriginal “problem”.

These shocking phrases echo Nazi terminology “the Jewish question” or “the problem,” which was a pretext for the attempted genocide of the Holocaust.

“For those who don’t know why Aboriginal netball players (and others) are concerned about Hancock Mining’s massive sponsorship offer. Just a simple reminder of what Lang Hancock’s solution to the ‘Aboriginal problem’ was in 1984,” he wrote on Twitter .

Netball Australia has been accused by Gina Rinehart of defaming virtue after its players questioned the sponsorship deal due to offensive comments made by their late father.

Netball Australia has been accused by Gina Rinehart of defaming virtue after its players questioned the sponsorship deal due to offensive comments made by their late father.

The outspoken Greens Senator Lydia Thorpe agreed with the netball player’s position.

“Hello to the wife of Nonger Donnell, the mother and the Diamonds team,” she wrote on Twitter.

Lang Hancock, founder of Hancock Prospecting, wanted the Aboriginals to assimilate or “breed themselves.”

Max Linoy, an Aboriginal academic in Queensland, cited hateful feelings in Hancock's interview as the reason behind the netball players' attitude.

Max Linoy, an Aboriginal academic in Queensland, cited hateful feelings in Hancock’s interview as the reason behind the netball players’ attitude.

Donnell was asked to play in a uniform without the Hancock crest, then her teammates joined her in solidarity.

Former soccer club captain and committed activist Craig Foster also felt Hancock Prospecting should have denounced its founder’s words.

“In order to offer an apology or at least some distance between Lang Hancock’s comments about the genocide and the current leadership values ​​of Hancock Prospecting, led by Gina Reinhart,” he tweeted.

“Definitely it should be a requirement of every affiliated sports federation.”

Lang Hancock’s offensive comments

In a 1984 television interview, Mr. Hancock made a shocking statement about Aboriginal Australians.

“Those who do themselves no good and cannot accept things multiply—and that is where most problems will arise,” Hancock said in the 1984 documentary.

“I would do a dose of water high enough to be sterile and self-replicating in the future and that should solve the problem.”

Mr Hancock died in 1992 at the age of 82 and said that Indigenous Australians who had been “assimilated” should be left alone.

“Those who are assimilated, you know, earn a living or earn salaries in civilized areas,” he said.

“Those who have been accepted into society and who have accepted society and can engage with society, I will leave them alone.”

Hancock gave the interview in 1984 for a current affairs program on indigenous issues, which even included a racial pun in the title: “We Couldn’t Be Fairer.”

Hancock, an outspoken right-wing extremist who supports conservative politicians and parties, shockingly suggests that so-called “semi-caste” (mixed-race) indigenous peoples should be discouraged from breeding.

“Those who cannot do themselves any good and do not accept things, half of them reproduce, and that is where the most problems will arise,” Hancock said.

“I would do a dose of water high enough to keep it sterile until it breeds in the future and that should solve the problem.”

His encounter goes back to the Stolen Generation, as Aboriginal children were moved away from their parents to assimilate into the “whites”.

Hancock also stated that indigenous peoples must accept and assimilate into “civilization”.

He said, “Those who are accustomed to living decently and earning a good wage in civilized areas, and who have been accepted into society and accepted by society and can deal with society, leave them alone.”

Upon termination of the sponsorship deal, Gina Rinehart and Hancock Prospecting accused netball players and officials of “virtue gestures”.

“Hancock and his CEO, Ms. Reinhart, believe that it is not necessary to misuse sports organizations for social or political purposes,” the company said in a statement.

“First, because sport is at its best when it focuses on good and fair competition with dedicated athletes who strive for excellence to fulfill their sporting dreams and represent our country at its best.”

Through its charitable and educational work, the company said it serves the real needs of Indigenous peoples “in a meaningful way, rather than by ‘indicating virtue’.”

The $15 million deal should be a lifeline for Netball Australia, which has lost $7 million over the past two years as Super Netball costs soar.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11346807/Gina-Rinehart-netball-row-fuelled-Lang-Hancocks-racist-remarks-Jacinta-Price-weighs-in.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign= 1490 & ito = 1490 Netball row over Gina Rinehart fueled by Lang Hancock’s racist remarks as Jacinta Price weighs in