Finally accepting that her tenure as prime minister was up late Wednesday night, Liz Truss went to the fridge at Flat No 10 and pulled out a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc to share with her husband, Hugh.

She had just endured a sweltering night in the House of Commons as more than 40 of her MPs failed to support her in a vote on fracking – leading to the astonishing spectacle of ministers dragging a vacillating Conservative Party into voting lobbies.

While she was nibbling on a pork pie, the couple agreed that it was a matter of timing, not whether she would step down.

A major consideration was the impact of the growing civil unrest on her two teenage daughters.

Downing Street staff were shedding tears as Ms Truss prepared her resignation, but she reassured them:

Tears were weeping for Downing Street employees when Ms Truss prepared her resignation, but she reassured them: “Don’t worry, I’m relieved it’s over.”

Mrs. Truss slept intermittently until 4:30 a.m., when she began to seek advice from helpers.

Later that morning, Number 10 asked Sir Graham Brady, Chairman of the 1922 Committee, to come to see the Prime Minister.

When I asked if the situation had recovered, he replied, “I don’t think so, Prime Minister.” game over.

While she was making her statement, her former advisor, Jason Stein, was watching the live broadcast on his phone from a table at The Ivy in Marylebone, London, one of Peter Mandelson’s favorite restaurants.

The prime minister directed the Labor Party’s Prince of Darkness to the prime minister’s questions the day before, saying, like Mr Mandelson, she was a “fighter, not a brawler”.

Until his suspension on Wednesday pending an investigation by the government’s fitness and ethics team into allegations of unauthorized briefings against his colleagues, Mr. Stein was the focus of Truss’ work as an assistant and all-purpose counsel.

He has told his friends that the Downing Street operation was “dysfunctional from the start” and blames “disordered command structures” for the biggest failure, the mini-budget, which even the prime minister now secretly calls “massive bullshit”. -high’.

Finally, Liz Truss accepted her period late Wednesday night, went to the fridge in Apartment 10 and pulled out a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc to share with her husband Hugh (pictured).

Finally, Liz Truss accepted her period late Wednesday night, went to the fridge in Apartment 10 and pulled out a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc to share with her husband Hugh (pictured).

Sources also describe conflicting meetings that led to the announcement that led to the dismissal of her advisor, Kwasi Quarting, and the cancellation of the vast majority of the mini-budgeting measures, in which Ms Truss was so angry with one of her employees that she once spoke of giving him “a leg prick”.

Sources are critical of the role of Truss’ chief of staff, Mark Fullbrook, calling his appointment a “disaster”. One revealed: “Liz was offered this job everywhere but no one would accept it. We had no choice but to give it to Fullbrook.

He was part of a secret meeting in Downing Street flat on September 13, during the official period of mourning for the Queen, when the family was being arranged behind Kwasi’s back.

“Liz, Fullbrook, and a few other helpers have been eating ready-made sushi and come up with this brilliant plan to cut the highest tax rate of 45 pence.

Treasury and Cabinet Minister [Simon Case] We were warned about this, but we had an absent chief of staff who was more focused on getting a huge contract with Conservative Campaign Headquarters to run the campaign.

Ms Truss was also “furious” during the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham when she was told that Mr Fullbrook had used her VIP room service for his own ends.

Sources also claimed that Ms. Truss was warned against Fallbrook’s appointment in August but insisted on his support.

On the morning of her resignation, Number 10 asked Sir Graham Brady, Chairman of the 1922 Committee, to come to meet the Prime Minister.

On the morning of her resignation, Number 10 asked Sir Graham Brady, Chairman of the 1922 Committee, to come to meet the Prime Minister.

Another source claimed that Ms Truss regretted appointing Matthew Sinclair, former executive director of think tank The TaxPayers’ Alliance, as her economic advisor because he “always talked about her in meetings and planning.”

She once said that if he continued like this, she would stab him in the leg. He never shut up.

A source said, “We also had trouble finding a whip head. Therese [Coffey] She rejected him because she wanted the freedom to defend the PM in the media, so we ended up with Wendy [Morton]. The whole thing became utter chaos, and Downing Street was bundled together over concessions.

Another source claimed that Mr Case was concerned about Ms Truss’ morale, telling colleagues that “while all prime ministers are lonely in office, this has happened to Liz very quickly”. “He became very, very anxious,” the source said.

Downing Street staff shed tears as Ms Truss prepared her resignation, but she reassured them: “Don’t worry, I’m relieved it’s over” before adding: “At least I was the prime minister.”

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11344317/Im-relieved-Ive-Prime-Minister-Liz-Truss-told-Downing-Street-staff.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490” Liz Truss told Downing Street employees that I’m relieved that it’s over… at least I was prime minister