There was something inescapable about the collapse of Liz Truss’ presidency.

Almost from day one their government struggled.

After Kwasi Karting was fired and her small budget scrapped, it was clear that her days were numbered. Now the Conservative Party must elect its new leader – and fast.

The new prime minister will face an almost unprecedented number of problems, both global and domestic.

In short, the party and the country are going through a crisis and call for strong and, most importantly, competent leadership.

This is not the time for wild experimentation and gambling.  After the turmoil of the past few weeks - which followed months of Boris' imposed power struggles - the Conservative Party needs to stabilize, David Davis wrote.

This is not the time for wild experimentation and gambling. After the turmoil of recent weeks – which followed months of Boris’s imposed power struggles – the Conservative Party needs to stabilize, David Davis wrote.

Just think of the set of challenges.

Internationally, the Russian-Ukrainian war creates a series of disasters that must be dealt with. For example, OPEC’s move to limit oil production will exacerbate the current energy crisis.

The division of the world into two blocs threatens Russia, China and the Western allies, the tremendous progress made in global trade since 1995.

Moreover, the world has failed to emerge from the economic turmoil of Covid and this will continue to create new problems.

Moreover, the end of the era of near-debt-free will come as a shock to everyone from mortgage holders to small businesses to nation states. And I wouldn’t be surprised if there was a European financial crisis in the next year or so.

At home we face a winter of strikes and a lack of energy. Budgeting books will put a tremendous strain on our public services. The NHS faces a backlog of issues which means tens of thousands of people will needlessly die until we fix it.

We can fill this page with the challenges facing the government.

In addition, the party needs to stabilize after the turmoil of the past few weeks – which followed months of power struggle at the hands of Boris.

Credibility must be restored, and that means a high-level cabinet that supports a high-ranking leader.  That's why I don't think the next leader should be Boris Johnson, wrote DAVID DAVIS

Credibility must be restored, and that means a high-level cabinet that supports a high-ranking leader. That’s why I don’t think the next leader should be Boris Johnson, wrote DAVID DAVIS

Credibility must be restored, and that means a high-level cabinet that supports a high-ranking leader. This is not the time for wild experimentation and gambling.

I don’t think the next leader should be Boris Johnson. The last months of his term as prime minister were in complete disarray, wreaking havoc both in the party and the country.

Towards the end of his term, he displayed poor judgment and a lack of leadership regarding the Partygate, the Chris Pincher scandal and the general direction of politics.

Additionally, we don’t yet have the results of the Partygate Franchise Committee’s investigation.

If the committee finds, as is likely, that Boris misled the House of Commons, he could end up being suspended or expelled from Parliament.

In other words, Boris could end up becoming prime minister and be fired weeks later – just like Truss. That could mean another leadership election in a few months. This is the last thing we need.

Honestly, the audience will think we’ve lost our senses. Benny Mordaunt and Rishi Sunak are both strong contenders for the top position. I supported all of them in the last stages of the driving competition.

Both demonstrated competence and leadership in the performance of their ministerial duties. I hope whoever wins the race, Mordaunt and Snack, will be part of the first team. This time, however, my vote goes to Rishi Sunak.

Penny Mordaunt

Rishi Sunak

Benny Mordaunt and Rishi Sunak are both strong contenders for the top position written by David Davis

First, it is the leader that international markets trust, and who, paradoxically, will save the government from having to set policies that dance to its tune.

Second, in the last leadership campaign, he showed character and courage by standing by him and demonstrating the dangers of Truss politics.

He effectively predicted what would happen and it turned out to be absolutely true. He is the only candidate to have done so, despite opposition from the conservative press.

Most importantly, he will have the technical skills and intellect to provide answers to the terrible problems we face over the next two years and enable our great country to reach its rightful place in the world.

It is also clear that Rishi’s election will stabilize markets, while Boris will destabilize them. No amount of showmanship and charm will make up for more expensive mortgages and more expensive groceries.

But it’s not just about the leader.

In fact, the roots of many of the last two prime ministers’ problems lie in the fact that they drew their governments almost entirely from a narrow group of personal supporters.

Boris essentially chose a cabinet of confidants he believed could be controlled.

First, it is the leader that international markets trust, and who ironically saves the government from having to make policies to carry out its debates, writes David Davis.

First, it is the leader that international markets trust, and who ironically saves the government from having to make policies to carry out its debates, writes David Davis.

He excluded a large number of talented and experienced ministers and made Rishi Sunak a last-minute advisor because Sajid Javid refused to be bullied by Dominic Cummings.

Liz Truss made a similar mistake, telling Grant Shapps that he was a good minister and outspoken speaker, but was fired for not voting for her.

What the party and the country need is a real selection of ministers on the basis of merit. It requires a wardrobe of all talents.

Indeed, I was amazed that many ministers in the government would agree that we need to reset credibility, which in turn requires a reappointment of the Cabinet.

Fortunately, the new rules will not allow a repeat of what happened in the last race, where dozens of candidates who knew they could not win used the leadership election as an opportunity to get a job in the next government.

The management process is not designed for this.

Ministers should be chosen on the basis of experience and ability, not as a reward for ambition, loyalty, or reckless tongue.

The challenges we face, from economic instability to failed global trade deals and from the massive NHS backlog to the war in Ukraine, require a tremendous amount of work.

Only with first-class ministers can we meet these challenges. This does not necessarily mean the abolition of the entire cabinet.

In fact, it would be wise to keep part of the higher gear team and part of the broader ministerial team in place.

For example, Ben Wallace excelled as Secretary of Defense and did very well in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. He must remain in office.

Above all, the next government must be able to maintain the credibility of the market. That’s a strong reason to keep Jeremy Hunt as chancellor. Hunt was able to regain some stability during his tenure, though short.

Given the sensitivity of the markets, it would be very dangerous to sacrifice that credibility by hiring another advisor – the third in a few weeks and the fifth in a few months.

There are other capable people, but I won’t mention them all. But we also need meaningful changes to bring greater diversity of voices and depth of experience to government.

I hope that whoever becomes the next prime minister will form a true unity government to deal with the many issues we face.

There is a lot of talent and experience in the back seats.

About 40 current members of the House of Representatives have previously served in the Cabinet, and many have served as junior ministers.

The next prime minister can choose from among all those who have a good reputation, proven experience, and a more or less guaranteed competence.

Our next leader must create a government of all talents, not a government of all their colleagues.

The party faces a major challenge, but it is also an opportunity to ensure the return of effective government.

The events of the past few weeks and months have shaken the credibility of the government and the party.

Restructuring the Cabinet with a number of members of proven competence will give renewed confidence to the public and the markets. This is the only way we can stand in the next election.

This is the only way the country can be given the leadership it so desperately needs.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11344323/DAVID-DAVIS-Rishi-Sunak-right-man-lead-chaos.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 DAVID DAVIS: Why Rishi Sunak He is the right man to get us out of this mess